wow it’s been a while

Tags: checking in

clannyphantom:

yes friends let us blaze the marijuana! four hundred and twenty haha

(via illusiorosa)

more fantrolls wheeeee

=====> Be the overconfident DJ.

Your name is STANIS BUUREN, and you’re the star of the Alternian NIGHTCLUBS! You’re a master of it all: trance, D’n’B, gabber, you name it, you’re probably really good at it. You make the DANCE FLOORS come ALIVE with your sick MASHUPS and NONSTOP MIXES. Even HER IMPERIOUS CONDESCENSION has attended your RAVES, WORKIN’ and TWERKIN’ her way through the crowd. Needless to say, your REPUTATION and POPULARITY are absolutely SKY-HIGH.

Your Trollian handle is statelyEntrancement [8] AND YOU HAVE TO YELL OVER THE FUCKIN SPEAKERS IN YOUR MESSAGES BECAUSE NOTHIN CAN STOP OR TOP YOUR DOPE ASS BEATS. [8]

Strife specibus: SawbladeKind

Page of Space

Land of Nebulae and Clubs

Ancestor: The Master DJ

——-

=====> Be the chivalrous highblood.

Your name is Venkos Shalox, and you have most honourably dedicated your life to helping those both WEAK and IN DANGER, regardless of caste. Because of this, you have gained a LARGELY CONFUSING REPUTATION. That doesn’t bother you, though. Many of your close friends are LOWBLOODS, and you’ve found they are LOYAL and DUTIFUL companions on your ADVENTURES. You do, however, have a fair distaste for other HIGHBLOODS due to an INCIDENT in which you lost your RIGHT EYE.

Your Trollian handle is wanderingKnight and thou hark’st o’er thy foes a mighty and most valiant pattern of speaking!

Strife specibus: RapierKind

Knight of Heart

Land of Castles and Twilight

Ancestor: The Cavalier

faggotbitchblowjob:

itsadani:

queenofthefluff:

SLENDERMAN BOYBAND.

ohgod

I approve.

Because I’m scary scary
HEY!
I’m Mr. Slender

faggotbitchblowjob:

itsadani:

queenofthefluff:

SLENDERMAN BOYBAND.

ohgod

I approve.

Because I’m scary scary

HEY!

I’m Mr. Slender

(Source: theoddgifdump, via blueangelbooty)

thewritingcafe:

For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.
When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:
Is it a spoken language?
Is it a written language?
Is it a sign language?
Is it a combination of the above?
Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:
What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?
Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:
Spoken Language:
Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
Written Language:

Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
Sign Language:

Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.


Other:
Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?
Create Your Own Language
How to Create a Language in One Day
Language Construction Kit
Using Invented Languages in Your Novel

thewritingcafe:

For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.

When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:

  1. Is it a spoken language?
  2. Is it a written language?
  3. Is it a sign language?
  4. Is it a combination of the above?

Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:

  1. What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
  2. How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
  3. Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
  4. Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?

Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:

Spoken Language:

  • Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
  • Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
  • Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
  • Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
  • Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
  • Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
  • Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
Written Language:
  • Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
  • Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
  • Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
  • Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
  • Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
Sign Language:
  • Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
  • Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.

Other:

  • Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
  • Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
  • History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?

Create Your Own Language

How to Create a Language in One Day

Language Construction Kit

Using Invented Languages in Your Novel

(via illusiorosa)

manisfrenchfries:

princekid13:

manga-maniac:

- That was a pretty easy catch.
- Sometimes all you gotta do is ask.

Does noone understand that James is like, the best trainer? He may not be the strongest, but he ASKS his pokemon if they want to join, seriously he’s nicer than Ash to his pokemon.

The poor man gets bitten, poisoned, chewed on, strangled, stabbed, prodded, crushed, blown up, and all manner of painful things by his pokemon, AND HE LOVES THEM ANYWAYS.

James needs his own show. Of when he was a kid or something. And his amazing gift with pokemon.

AND HE’S ALSO A CROSS-DRESSER WHO GIVES NO FUCKS, HE’S A DORK WHO COLLECTS BOTTLE CAPS, IS SMOOTH AS FUCK WITH THAT TRADEMARK ROSE, AND IS A GROWN MAN, THEREFORE INSTANTLY ATTRACTIVE.

(via illusiorosa)

(Source: seijass, via illusiorosa)

wen u cum hoem munnin-chan amke da spaghtietii 4 u

wen u cum hoem munnin-chan amke da spaghtietii 4 u

Tags: FUCK dattorata

Tags: FUCK

  • Me: (Listening to Armin van Buuren Presents: Gaia - J'ai Envie De Toi)
  • Me: WELCOME
  • Me: TO THE DANCE FLOOR
  • Me: A PLACE YOU SHARE WITH MILLIONS OF OTHERS AROUND THE WORLD
  • Me: IN A
  • Me: STATE
  • Me: OF
  • Me: TITAN
  • Me: HERE IS YOUR DJ
  • Me: ARMIN VAN ARLERT
  • Datt: someone needs to makr this joke

awakened-artifact:

smtskulltrumpeter:

AN EXAMPLE OF GOOD USAGE OF VOICE ACTING IN A MEGA MAN BATTLE:

Elpizo’s forms both utilize randomized movesets, and their actions tend to have an accompanying sound clip. The sound clips are randomized that they still keep a level of interest going, and Elpizo successfully gives off an air throughout the entire battle.

His second battle starts out with one of the more anguished transformation screams of Mega Man history, and while he becomes extremely easy he nevertheless has a voice that sounds like he’s constantly in pain. It helps set the mood for the battle along with the extremely neat form he takes at this point.

When I was a kid It never occured to me, but looking at this again many years later, that scream when he changes forms is rather unsettling, I never realized he was in pain. It makes sense now though.

While the fight itself may have been fairly disappointing, Elpizo as a character and the voice acting, though sparse in use, are what make this battle great. You’re both fighting to stop Elpizo’s plan and, in a roundabout way, free him from the agony of being the Dark Elf’s puppet and in turn free him of his insatiable lust for power.

And no matter how you look at it, Elpizo’s agonized scream is still hundreds of times better than the Mega Man 8 voice acting.

  • Me: "The two trod hastily through the packed snow, the white powder crunching underfoot the only sound to accompany the silence of the ivory-draped forest."
  • Me: seriously what kind of shit is this
  • Datt: sounds like an interesting porno

>Writes a short bit of creative fantasy writing for a huge plot I have in my head

>Read through it

>”Eurgh this is awful” “ugh what was I thinking when I wrote this shit”

>Delete everything and close the word document

Reblog if you want a colour!

  • Red: I often scroll back through your blog
  • Fuschia: You're my senpai!
  • Orange: We should be friends!
  • Violet: You're beneath me, but I follow you anyway.
  • Gold: I'm doomed and so are you.
  • Purple: You need to calm down...
  • Slate: I hate you a lot
  • Indigo: You're quiet, or maybe a little strange, but I like you.
  • Olive: I think you're adorable!
  • Cobalt: I don't like you that much but I still follow you anyway.
  • Jade: I like your selfies, you should post more!
  • Teal: Your creative works are great!